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KIDSta Webinars

The KIDSta project was created to provide training and technical assistance for all members of the multidisciplinary process responding to prepubertal children who have experienced sexual abuse. The KIDSta webinars will endeavor to provide on line training on topics that are contained within the recommendations of the Pediatric SAFE Protocol. 

 

New Webinars for 2018 --- see below -- REGISTER today!

 

  

For more webinars of interest, visit www.safeta.org.

 

Title

      Date
Differential Diagnosis in Pediatric Sexual Assault: Finding the Zebra

Due to the well documented acute and long term negative health consequences associated with child sexual abuse, the medical forensic examination is an integral component of the coordinated community response to child sexual abuse. Timely, comprehensive exams, by pediatric examiners who are specifically trained in pediatric sexual abuse, should be made available to all children who are suspected of or disclose sexual abuse. When the examination findings are normal, this does not confirm nor rule out abuse, and the clinician needs to explain this to the non-offending caregiver and MDT partners. Additionally, sexual abuse of the child is distinct due to their dependence on their caregivers, and the ability of the perpetrators to manipulate the child and prevent them from disclosing. This webinar presentation will illustrate the differential diagnosis tree the clinician must consider when performing a prepubescent medical forensic exam or consulting when ano-genital injury has been identified. A review of normal pediatric anogenital anatomy, followed by case studies that include normal variants that can be mistaken for abuse, STI’s that may mimic trauma, straddle injury review, and traumatic injuries from sexual abuse.

Presented by: Diane Daiber, BSN, RN, SANE-A, SANE-P, Forensic Nursing Specialist with the International Association of Forensic Nurses & Kim Nash, BSN, RN, SANE-A, SANE-P, Forensic Nursing Specialist with the International Association of Forensic Nurses

 

   

June 19, 2018

2:00 pm ET


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The SART Toolkit: tools and resources to facilitate a coordinated team approach to sexual assault.

The collaborative team approach to sexual assault is a recommendation contained in the US DOJ’s National SAFE Protocol. Forensic Nurses are often intimately involved in the creation of Sexual Assault Response Team’s (SARTs) and in sustaining them. Since the original Toolkit was created in 2009 there have been updates to the SAFE Protocol, the creation of a new Pediatric SAFE Protocol and other guiding documents for response teams to use. This webinar will introduce forensic nurses to the updated Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) Toolkit, hosted by the National Sexual Violence Resource Center. The new SART Toolkit is the result of collaborative efforts to provide evidence-based information on best practices to SARTs. We will engage the attendees in a discussion about SARTs multidisciplinary needs, including review of best practices around multidisciplinary teamwork, sustainability, agency buy-in, and systems change, all of which will empower teams to better evaluate their ongoing needs and increase their ability to serve victims. The format of the Toolkit will provide a foundation for the discussion as live links will be explored to answer participant’s questions and connect them with applicable resources. The SART Toolkit will be especially useful to Forensic Nurses as they work with collaborative partners providing services to victims of sexual violence. All aspects of multidisciplinary teamwork from the nuances of agenda setting, creating an engaging environment for the team, to optimistic strategic planning will all be components of the conversation during this session. Overcoming the challenges of disagreements among team members, developing written response protocols, problem solving, meetings, strategic planning, and evaluation are all areas that will be included in the conversation. This presentation is designed to include audience participation and provide resources found within the SART Toolkit. This will serve as an opportunity to explore any of the topics listed above, among others and any challenges that the attendees have found in their own SART’s development process or sustainability.

Presented by: Christina Presenti, Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) Coordinator with the National Sexual Violence Resource Center Kim Day, RN, SANE-A, SANE-P, Forensic Nursing Director at the International Association of Forensic Nurses (IAFN).

 

   

July 12, 2018

2:00 pm ET


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Post Exposure Prophylaxis to HIV: Make it Simple

Non-occupational post-exposure prophylaxis (nPEP) should be started rapidly after sexual assault. The CDC treatment guidelines have recommended guidelines in place for occupational exposure since 1996 and non-occupational exposure since 2005. Although the guidelines have been updated and streamlined in subsequent years, healthcare providers still struggle with providing CDC recommended nPEP. The AIDS Education & Training Center (AETC) Program Rural Health Committee, the Georgia Department of Public Health, the IAFN and the National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership has developed a Post-Sexual Exposure nPEP Toolkit. This webinar will provide an overview of the resources and materials that are provided in the toolkit and the circumstances when it should be used.

 >Presented by: John Nelson, PhD, CNS, CPNP, AIDS Education & Training Center National Coordinating Resource Center, Program Director & Gregory S. Felzien, MD, AAHIVS, Medical Advisor, Georgia Department of Public Health, Division of Health Protection/IDI-HIV

   

Archived / On Demand

May 2018


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Legal Protections and Forensic Considerations for Immigrant and Refugee Child Victims

Immigrant and refugee children suffer multiple traumas in their home countries, during their process of immigration and are highly vulnerable to victimization following their arrival in the United States. This webinar will discuss how migration, immigration status, culture and trauma impact the physical, brain and emotional development children who are victims of sexual assault and child abuse and the special needs of immigrant and refugee child victims. There are multiple forms of immigration relief that have been designed to offer protection for children who have been victims of domestic and/or sexual violence. Immigration relief is available both for immigrant child victims and for immigrant non-abusive parents of citizen and foreign-born child victims. A central focus of the webinar will be to provide practical tools for assisting abused children and their protective parents in accessing the legal remedies they qualify to receive under immigration, public benefits and family law. The webinar will include a discussion of the special role well-written reports from forensic examinations can play as evidence in immigration and family law cases involving abused immigrant and refugee children.

Presented by: Giselle A. Hass, Psy.D., ABAP & Leslye Orloff, Adjunct Professor & Director of the National Immigrant Women's Advocacy Project (NIWAP) at American University Washington College of Law

   

Archived / On Demand

November 2017


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A Team Approach: Child Life’s Role in Pediatric Sexual Abuse Cases

This webinar will focus on the collaboration between Pediatric Forensic Examiners and Certified Child Life Specialists (CCLS), particularly on the role of Child Life Specialists during the sexual abuse medical forensic exam. As trained medical professionals, Child Life Specialists utilize knowledge of child development, stress and coping theories, and family systems theories to promote positive outcomes during pediatric sexual abuse examinations. Working alongside Pediatric Forensic Examiners, Child Life Specialists are able to promote positive coping through rapport building, preparation, and developmentally appropriate diversional activities. During this webinar, the audience will learn about the role Child Life Specialists play while supporting staff, patients, and families during pediatric medical forensic exams. After the webinar, audiences should be able to: implement basic knowledge of child development theories during medical forensic exams, understand the role of child life, and name three successful outcomes that indicate positive coping during medical forensic exams.

 Presented by: Erin Naumann & Christine Garrison, Certified Child Life Specialists at Cleveland Clinic Children’s at Hillcrest Hospital.

   

Archived / On Demand

November 2017


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Engaging and Supporting Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders through a Medical Forensic Examination

Research has shown that individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders experience abuse and sexual victimization at rates higher than the general population. Compounding this problem, individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders experience an array of communication difficulties as well as confusion and anxiety in new and unfamiliar situations, particularly those related to medical examinations and procedures. Under these circumstances, routine hospital visits can quickly become overwhelming and traumatic. A medical forensic examination, following an already traumatic experience of suspected sexual abuse, can thus magnify the individual’s anxiety and lead to increased agitation and difficulty completing the examination. In this training, participants will learn about the prevalence, core features, and range of symptom presentations of Autism Spectrum Disorders and the implications for providing effective services and supports to individuals with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. The presenter will share general tips and strategies for engaging and supporting individuals with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. Practical skills will be shared to address challenges specific to the forensic examination following an allegation or disclosure of sexual abuse to minimize additional trauma or anxiety for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

 Presented by: Ember Lee, PhD

   

Archived / On Demand

October 2017


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How Language Helps Shape Our Response to Sexual Violence

When discussing sexual violence, we often use the language of consensual sex to describe assaultive acts or use euphemisms, erotic, or affectionate terms to portray violent acts. This language implies consent and romance, rather than criminal acts. In addition, we tend to describe violence against women in passive terms, which allows the perpetrators of this violence to remain invisible and unaccountable. We also use language that objectifies or blames sexual assault victims. This interactive session will explore the language of sexual assault: how we talk about and write about this crime. We will discuss specific examples of the language we use and explore how to discuss sexual assault in a way that more accurately depicts the crime. This session is applicable to all members of the response team who work with survivors of sexual and domestic violence.

Presented by: Claudia Bayliff, Attorney at Law


   

Archived / On-Demand

August 2017


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Demystifying the Prepubescent Medical Forensic Examination

The Medical Forensic examination is an integral component of the child sexual abuse response and requires coordination of services among multidisciplinary team (MDT) members as they are often the gateway to the child’s access to health care and the exam. While the U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women’s (OVW) National Protocol for Sexual Abuse Medical Forensic Examinations Pediatric (2016) recommends that the urgency of the examination be determined by a health care provider, nonclinical members of the MDT need to understand what the prepubescent medical forensic exam entails, and to be prepared to dispel any misconceptions or fears the child or caregiver may have about the examination. This presentation will highlight key components of the medical forensic examination, and illustrate evidenced based examples of the exam and resources available through the IAFN’s Pediatric Technical Assistance Project and the www.KIDSta.org website.

Presented by: Diane Daiber

   

Archived / On-Demand

June 2017


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Photography in Sexual Assault Care

The National Protocol for Sexual Assault Medical Forensic Examinations Adult/Adolescent 2nd Ed. and new National Protocol for Sexual Abuse Medical Forensic Examinations: Pediatric both include photography as an integral component of the exam. There are many exam and policy considerations that go into incorporating photography and photo-documentation as part of the medical forensic patient evaluation.

Presented by: Jennifer Pierce-Weeks and Kim Day


   

Archived / On-Demand

June 2017


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Supporting Deaf Child Survivors of Sexual Abuse

Research has shown that Deaf children experience abuse and neglect at rates 1.5-3 times higher than hearing children. Compounding this problem, Deaf children experience an array of communication and cultural barriers when getting support from victim services, medical providers, and the criminal justice system. In this training, participants will learn about Deaf culture and communities in the United States and the implications for providing effective services and supports to Deaf survivors. Presenters will share research on the sexual abuse of Deaf children and discuss the many challenges these children face when getting support. Practical skills and resources will be shared to address these barriers and provide services that are culturally and linguistically specific.

Presented by: Nancy Smith, Center on Victimization and Safety, Vera Institute of Justice and Jessalyn Frank, Independent Consultant

   

Archived / On-Demand

May 2017


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Informed Consent for Sexual Assault Exams: It is Not Just a Signature, it’s a Process

Sexual assault victims must provide informed consent for a medical forensic exam. Although the concept of informed consent is a term that healthcare providers are very familiar with, there are additional legal implications associated with consent for the exam that providers need to understand. Victims need relevant information on the impact of participating in or declining each component of the exam.

Presented by: Claudia Bayliff and Kim Day

 

   

Archived / On-Demand

May 2017


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The National Sexual Assault Medical Forensic Exam Response Protocols and Federal Funding (VOCA and VAWA)

 

A resource for Forensic Program Coordinators.

 

The U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women released the, National Protocol for Sexual Assault Medical Forensic Examinations: Adult/Adolescent (SAFE Protocol) originally in 2004, and a second edition in 2013. Additionally the National Protocol for Sexual Abuse Medical Forensic Examinations: Pediatric (Pediatric SAFE Protocol) was released in April 2016. Both documents provide evidence based, best practice recommendations to health care professionals who are completing the sexual assault medical forensic examinations, regardless if the exam is for adults, adolescents or for children and provide guidance for the multidisciplinary team members responding to sexual violence across the lifespan.
Presented by: Marnie Shiels, Attorney Advisor for the Office on Violence Against Women, Joel Hall, Office of Justice Programs, Kim Day, RN, SANE-A, SANE-P, SAFEta Project Director, IAFN, Diane Daiber, RN, SANE-A, SANE-P, Pediatric Training Specialist, IAFN

  Archived / On-Demand

March 2017


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The National Protocol for Sexual Abuse Medical Forensic Examinations: Pediatric

In April, 2016, the U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) released the National Protocol for Sexual Abuse Medical Forensic Examinations: Pediatric (Pediatric SAFE Protocol), which was developed in partnership with the International Association of Forensic Nurses (IAFN). During this interactive webinar, the presenter panel will describe for stakeholders the necessity for development of the Pediatric SAFE Protocol, the contributions of both medical and multidisciplinary child sexual abuse experts in shaping the evidence-based practice recommendations within the Pediatric SAFE Protocol, and the recommendations with regard to clinicians caring for child sexual abuse victims. In addition, the presenters will illustrate the pediatric technical assistance project, KIDSta.org that will offer supplemental material useful to the practicing clinician as well as the multidisciplinary team.
Presented by: Marnie Shiels, Attorney Advisor for the Office on Violence Against Women, Dr. Sharon Cooper, CEO of Developmental and Forensic Pediatrics, PA, Diana Schunn, RN, SANE-A, SANE-P, Executive Director of the Child Advocacy Center of Sedgwick County, Kim Day, RN, SANE-A, SANE-P, SAFEta Project Director with IAFN, Diane Daiber, RN, SANE-A, SANE-P, Pediatric Training Specialist, with IAFN 

  Archived / On-Demand

June 2016


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Archived / On-Demand

2010


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Archived / On-Demand

2010


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Archived / On-Demand

May 2016

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